Vought F4U Corsair 1/100 Scale Diecast Metal Model by Daron

$ 24.99

1:100 Scale  Diecast Metal – Vought F4U Corsair – Length: 4"  Wingspan: 4.75”

 

 

This Corsair model is made to be displayed in the inflight configuration, there is no option for a landing gear. It is mostly made of metal and very heavy/dense. It is certainly not a toy and will not survive been played with or a fall. It has many guns and antennas sticking out and these are very fragile.

Although it is a small scale, the details are very impressive. From the photos one can see and appreciate the transparent cockpit windshield. The propeller is free to rotate and very smooth. If one blows onto the front of the plane, the propeller starts spinning.

Since there is no option for a landing gear, a stand where the model can be attached for display is included and the model's info (type of airplane and scale).

Please notice the scale, at 1/100 scale this model is quite small measuring about 4 inches long and 4.75 inches wide of wingspan.

 The maker of the model really did a good job with the model, the panel lines and details are very clear and crisp.What really caught my attention, however, is the way the markings and coloring. Look at the photos and you will see very clear and crisp nose art and markings.

 

The Chance Vought F4U Corsair was an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II and the Korean War. Demand for the aircraft soon overwhelmed Vought's manufacturing capability, resulting in production by Goodyear and Brewster: Goodyear-built Corsairs were designatedFG and Brewster-built aircraft F3A. From the first prototype delivery to the U.S. Navy in 1940, to final delivery in 1953 to the French, 12,571 F4U Corsairs were manufactured by Vought,[1] in 16 separate models, in the longest production run of any piston-engined fighter in U.S. history (1942–53).[2][3][4]

 

The Corsair was designed as a carrier-based aircraft. However its difficult carrier landing performance rendered the Corsair unsuitable for Navy use until the carrier landing issues were overcome when used by the British Fleet Air Arm. The Corsair thus came to and retained prominence in its area of greatest deployment: land based use by the U.S. Marines.[5] The role of the dominant U.S. carrier based fighter in the second part of the war was thus filled by the Grumman F6F Hellcat, powered by the same Double Wasp engine first flown on the Corsair's first prototype in 1940.[6] The Corsair served to a lesser degree in the U.S. Navy. As well as the U.S. and British use the Corsair was also used by the Royal New Zealand Air Force, the French Navy Aéronavale and other, smaller, air forces until the 1960s. Some Japanese pilots regarded it as the most formidable American fighter of World War II,[7] and the U.S. Navy counted an 11:1 kill ratio with the F4U Corsair.[8]

After the carrier landing issues had been tackled it quickly became the most capable carrier-basedfighter-bomber of World War II. The Corsair served almost exclusively as a fighter-bomber throughout the Korean War and during the French colonial wars in Indochina and Algeria.[9]