North American B-25 Mitchell Doolittle Raid 40-2344 1/200 Scale Diecast Metal Model by Air Force 1

$ 19.99

1:200 Scale Diecast Metal  – Northrop B-25 Mitchell "02344 Doolittle Raid" – Length: 3.25"  Wingspan: 4.125”

 

This B-25 Mitchell model has a fixed landing gear, there is no display stand included and the model has not hole/slit to accommodate for one. The wheels cannot roll. The fuselage and the wings are all metal and really quite heavy.

 

 

Although it is a small scale, the details are very impressive. From the photos one can see and appreciate the transparent cockpit windshield, as well as the other transparent parts on the dorsal gun position. The propellers are free to rotate and very smooth.

This model has tail number 02344 which would be the plane that Lieutenant Colonel James "Jimmy" Doolittle piloted for the Doolittle Raid aka. Tokyo Raid on April 18, 1942.

   

The maker of the model, Air Force 1, really did a good job with the model, the panel lines and details are very crisp and one can see the little dots that represent the rivets holding down the panels.

 

 

 

This is really a "no-play" model or a "display-only" model. It is mostly metal and very heavy. It also has a number of antennas which look great but are very fragile. If you have small kids that like to play with your models, save yourself some frustration (and money) and wait till later to get a model like this one. The box is labeled as not suitable for children under 14.

 

 

 

The box measures 5 inches by 5 inches by 2 inches.

 

The North American B-25 Mitchell is an American twin-engine, medium bomber manufactured by North American Aviation (NAA). It was named in honor of Major General William "Billy" Mitchell, a pioneer of U.S. military aviation. Used by many Allied air forces, the B-25 served in every theater of World War II and after the war ended many remained in service, operating across four decades. Produced in numerous variants, nearly 10,000 Mitchells rolled from NAA factories.[1] These included a few limited models, such as the United States Marine Corps' PBJ-1 patrol bomber and the United States Army Air Forces' F-10 reconnaissance aircraft and AT-24 trainers.