Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird Spy Plane 1/200 Scale Diecast Metal Model by Air Force 1

$ 22.99

1:200 Scale  Diecast Metal – Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird – Length: 6.25"  Wingspan: 3.25”

This collection of models is made by Air Force 1 under the brand name of Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.

This Blackbird model has its landing gear extended permanently. The wheels on the landing gear do not turn.  The model is mostly made of metal and very heavy/dense. It is certainly not a toy and will not survive been played with or a fall.

An all metal display stand is included. This display needs some minor assembly. The type of airplane and scale of the model are printed on the display stand.

The box is labeled as Adult Collectible Model and Recommends 14 and older.

Although it is a small scale, the details are very impressive. From the photos one can see and appreciate the transparent cockpit windshield. The engines are part of the wing assembly, which in turn is one single piece. There are very few gaps and/or joints in this model.

The maker of the model, Air Force 1, really did a good job with the model, the panel lines and details are very clear and crisp.What really caught my attention, however, is the way the markings and coloring. Look at the photos and you will see very clear and crisp nose art and markings.

 

The Lockheed SR-71 "Blackbird" is a long-rangeMach 3+ strategic reconnaissance aircraft that was operated by the United States Air Force.[1] It was developed as a black project from the Lockheed A-12 reconnaissance aircraft in the 1960s by Lockheed and its Skunk Works division. Renowned American aerospace engineer Clarence "Kelly" Johnson was responsible for many of the design's innovative concepts. During aerial reconnaissance missions, the SR-71 operated at high speeds and altitudes to allow it to outrace threats. If a surface-to-air missile launch was detected, the standard evasive action was simply to accelerate and outfly the missile.[2] The SR-71 was designed to have basic stealth characteristics and served as a precursor to future stealth aircraft.

The SR-71 served with the U.S. Air Force from 1964 to 1998. A total of 32 aircraft were built; 12 were lost in accidents with none lost to enemy action.[3][4] The SR-71 has been given several nicknames, including Blackbird andHabu.[5] It has held the world record for the fastest air-breathing manned aircraft since 1976; this record was previously held by the related Lockheed YF-12.