Japanese Navy Carrier Cruiser Mogami 1/1100 Scale Diecast Metal Model Ship by Eaglemoss

$ 32.99

1/1100 Scale Aircraft Carrier Cruiser Mogami : Length: 7.25", Width: 1.125"
 
These models come already assembled and painted out of the box. There is nothing to do or needed other than take them out of the packaging and display them. Moreover, these models are Japanese imports, so the packaging and labeling are all in Japanese. For example, the photos clearly display the ship's name and info in Japanese. 
 

Warships of the World collection from Eaglemoss is a breakthrough for both military and maritime enthusiasts. Each has details and features that even the most discriminating collectors will appreciate:

 

  • A consistent 1:1100 scale that makes for a stunning display, with each ship visually comparable to all the others in the collection.

 

  • Heavy-duty metal construction with finely molded plastic detail parts. Miniature aircraft with cranes, detailed guns with blast bags, and a complete superstructure.

 

  • Textured surfaces that simulate wooden decks, intricate ironwork, chains and cleats.

 

  • Accurate colors and markings, from anti-fouling paint on the hulls to camouflage patterns, national insignia (including roundels on aircraft), and even runway markings.

 

  • A removable, customized display stand with the ship's name (in Japanese) and year.

 

Mogami (最上?) was the lead ship in the four-vessel Mogami class of heavy cruisers in the Imperial Japanese Navy. She was named after the Mogami River inTōhoku region of Japan. The Mogami-class ships were constructed as "light cruisers" (per the Washington Naval Treaty) with five triple 6.1-inch dual purpose guns. They were exceptionally large for light cruisers, and the barbettes for the main battery were designed for quick refitting with twin 8-inch guns. In 1937 all four ships were "converted" to heavy cruisers in this fashion.[4] Mogami served in numerous combat engagements in World War II, until she was sunk at theBattle of Leyte Gulf in October 1944.