Eurofighter Typhoon UK 1/100 Scale Diecast Metal Model by Amercom

$ 26.99

1:100 Scale  Diecast Metal  – Eurofighter Typhoon – Length: 7.75"  Wingspan: 5”

 

This Eurofighter Typhoon model is a single seat model and does include a pilot figure. The cockpit can not open. The landing gear is nicely detailed and is fixed in the extended position. Attached to the wings are a pair of external fuel tanks and attached to the fuselage are two pairs of medium range AA missles. A stand where the model can be attached for display is included. The display stand has the model's info such as country, flag and scale.

 

The maker of the model, Amercom, really did a good job with the model, the diecast metal construction feels quite heavy. The metal seems too be more rigid and thicker than comparable 1/100 scale models. The panel lines and details are very clear and crisp.What really caught my attention, however, is the way the markings and coloring are done. At 1/100 scale, these models are in the range of 5.5 to 7 inches long, and although not as big as their 1/72 cousins, the details in the markings is very impressive. I looked at them under a magnifying glass (just out of curiosity) and one could actually read the text in the markings.

 

 

These models come in what could be described as a disposable blister pack (sandwiched between two transparent plastic shells and then glued/attached to a piece of cardboard with the branding info. There is really nothing spectacular about the packaging, but at the end, the packaging is supposed to be disposable and with the sole function protecting the model, which it does very well.

 

Unlike bigger models, there is nothing to assemble for these models. All weapons and fuel tanks are already attached to the model. One just needs to open the pack and display it (or play with it).

 

The packaging labels these model as "Collectible Product" and "Not suitable for children under 14 years". I say these are PERFECT to collect and play. At 1/100 scale, space will not be a limiting issue (nor will price, for that matter) and the size and weight is almost designed to be played with, since it can be securely held with one hand. Could it survive a 7 year old? I say yes. Maybe the antennas and weapons might detach but the model itself should remain in one piece. 

 

The Eurofighter Typhoon is a twin-enginecanard-delta wingmultirole fighter.[5][6] The Typhoon was designed and is manufactured by a consortium of three companies; Alenia AermacchiAirbus Group and BAE Systems, who conduct the majority of affairs dealing with the project through a joint holding company,Eurofighter Jagdflugzeug GmbH, which was formed in 1986. The project is managed by the NATO Eurofighter and Tornado Management Agency, which also acts as the prime customer.[7]

Development of the aircraft effectively began in 1983 with the Future European Fighter Aircraft programme, a multinational collaborative effort between the UK, Germany, France, Italy and Spain. Because of disagreements over design authority and operational requirements, France left the consortium to develop the Dassault Rafaleindependently instead. A technology demonstration aircraft, the British Aerospace EAP, first took flight on 6 August 1986; the first prototype of the finalised Eurofighter made its first flight on 27 March 1994. The name of the aircraft, Typhoon, was formally adopted in September 1998; the first production contracts were signed that same year.

Political issues in the partner nations significantly protracted the Typhoon's development; the sudden end of theCold War reduced European demand for fighter aircraft, and there was debate over the cost and work share of the Eurofighter. The Typhoon was introduced into operational service in 2003. Currently, the type has entered service with the Austrian Air Force, the Italian Air Force, the German Air Force, the Royal Air Force, the Spanish Air Force, and the Royal Saudi Air Force. The Royal Air Force of Oman has also been confirmed as an export customer, bringing the procurement total to 571 aircraft as of 2013.

The Eurofighter Typhoon is a highly agile aircraft, designed to be an effective dogfighter when in combat with other aircraft; later production aircraft have been increasingly better equipped to undertake air-to-surface strike missions and to be compatible with a likewise increasing number of different armaments and equipment. The Typhoon saw its combat debut during the 2011 military intervention in Libya with the Royal Air Force and the Italian Air Force, performing aerial reconnaissance and ground strike missions. The type has also taken primary responsibility for air-defence duties for the majority of customer nations.