de Havilland Mosquito Fighter-Bomber - Royal Canadian Air Force - 1/72 Scale Diecast Metal Model by Oxford

$ 28.99

1:72 Scale  Metal Diecast - de Haviland Mosquito Muti-Role British Airplane - Royal Canadian Air Force– Length: 7"  Wingspan: 9”

This Mosquito model is a single seat plane. The cockpit is glue shut. It has no pilot/crew figures included. The landing gear is modeled in the retracted position. A display stand is included.

This is really a "no-play" model or a "display-only" model. It is mostly metal and very heavy. It also has a number of antennas which look great but are very fragile. If you have small kids that like to play with your models, save yourself some frustration (and money) and wait till later to get a model like this one. The box is labeled as not suitable for children under 14.

The maker of this model, Oxford, did a good job with this model, specifically the color scheme and the markings are very crisp and clear. The panel lines and hatches are very nicely done (engraved).

The box measures at 9.5 inches by 9.5 inches by 3.25 inches.

  

The de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito was a British multi-role combat aircraft with a two-man crew that served during and after the Second World War. It was one of few operational front-line aircraft of the era constructed almost entirely of wood and was nicknamed "The Wooden Wonder".[4] [nb 1] The Mosquito was also known affectionately as the "Mossie" to its crews.[5] Originally conceived as an unarmed fast bomber, the Mosquito was adapted to roles including low to medium-altitude daytimetactical bomber, high-altitude night bomberpathfinderday or night fighterfighter-bomberintruder,maritime strike aircraft, and fast photo-reconnaissance aircraft. It was also used by the British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) as a fast transport to carry small high-value cargoes to, and from, neutral countries, through enemy-controlled airspace.[6] A single passenger could be carried in the aircraft's bomb bay, which was adapted for the purpose.[7]

When production of the Mosquito began in 1941, it was one of the fastest operational aircraft in the world.[8] Entering widespread service in 1942, the Mosquito was a high-speed, high-altitude photo-reconnaissance aircraft, continuing in this role throughout the war. From mid-1942 to mid-1943, Mosquito bombers flew high-speed, medium or low-altitude missions against factories, railways and other pinpoint targets in Germany and German-occupied Europe. From late 1943, Mosquito bombers were formed into the Light Night Strike Force and used as pathfinders for RAF Bomber Command's heavy-bomber raids. They were also used as "nuisance" bombers, often dropping Blockbuster bombs – 4,000 lb (1,812 kg) "cookies" – in high-altitude, high-speed raids that German night fighters were almost powerless to intercept.

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