Consolidated B-24 Liberator "Witchcraft" 1/163 Scale Diecast Metal Model by Daron

$ 29.99

1:163 Scale  Diecast Metal – Consolidated B-24 Liberator – Length: 4.5"  Wingspan: 8”

This B-24 model is made to be displayed in the inflight configuration, there is no option for a landing gear. It is mostly made of metal and very heavy/dense. It is certainly not a toy and will not survive been played with or a fall. It has many guns and antennas sticking out and these are very fragile.

Although it is a small scale, the details are very impressive. From the photos one can see and appreciate the transparent cockpit windshield, as well as the other transparent parts in the different gun positions and view ports. Even the tail gun positions looks accurate and have gun barrels sticking out. The propellers are free to rotate and very smooth. If one blows onto the front of the plane, all four propellers start spinning.

 Since there is no option for a landing gear, a stand where the model can be attached for display is included and the model's info (type of airplane and scale).

The maker of the model really did a good job with the model, the panel lines and details are very clear and crisp.What really caught my attention, however, is the way the markings and coloring. Look at the photos and you will see very clear and crisp nose art and markings.

The Consolidated B-24 Liberator is an American heavy bomber, designed by Consolidated Aircraft ofSan Diego, California. It was known within the company as the Model 32, and some initial models were laid down as export models designated as various LB-30s, in the Land Bomber design category. The B-24 was used in World War II by every branch of the American armed forces, as well as by several Alliedair forces and navies, attaining a distinguished war record with its operations in the Western European,PacificMediterranean, and China-Burma-India Theaters and in antisubmarine warfare.

In comparison to the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, the B-24 was a more modern design, with a higher top speed, greater range, and heavier bomb load. However, it had a lower operational ceiling and was also more difficult to fly in formation at higher altitude due to heavy control forces. The shoulder placement of the B-24's high aspect ratio wing made the aircraft vulnerable to battle damage and in water landings. The B-24 was notorious among American aircrews for its tendency to catch fire. Its shoulder-mounted "Davis wing" did not provide a broad surface for emergency landings, therefore an impact on the fuselage tended to crush it and dislodge turrets. Nevertheless, the B-24 provided excellent service in a variety of roles due to its large payload and very long range. Among its varied uses, it was deployed as the carrier for the 1,000 lb Azon guided bomb.