Canadair Sabre Mk6 (F-86) German Air Force 1/72 Scale Diecast Model

$ 26.99

1:72 Scale  Diecast Metal  – Canadair Sabre Mk6 F-86  – Length: 6"  Wingspan: 6.25”

 

This Sabre model is a single seat model and does include a pilot figure. The cockpit can not open. The landing gear is nicely detailed and is fixed in the extended position. Attached to the wings are a pair of external fuel tanks and a pair of AA missiles. A center line fuel tanks is attached to the fuselage. A stand where the model can be attached for display is included. The display stand has the model's info such as country, flag and scale.

 

The maker of the model, Amercom, really did a good job with the model, the diecast metal construction feels quite heavy. The metal seems too be more rigid and thicker than comparable 1/72 scale models. The panel lines and details are very clear and crisp.What really caught my attention, however, is the way the markings and coloring are done.

 

One thing to notice about this particular model is that it is rear heavy, so when placed on its landing gear, the model will actually tip upward. To be able to display the model resting on its landing gear, one would have to insert something heavy on the front of the model so that it can become front heavy.

 

These models come in what could be described as a disposable blister pack (sandwiched between two transparent plastic shells and then glued/attached to a piece of cardboard with the branding info. There is really nothing spectacular about the packaging, but at the end, the packaging is supposed to be disposable and with the sole function protecting the model, which it does very well.

 

Unlike bigger models, there is nothing to assemble for these models. All weapons and fuel tanks are already attached to the model. One just needs to open the pack and display it (or play with it).

 

The packaging labels these model as "Collectible Product" and "Not suitable for children under 14 years". I say these are PERFECT to collect and play. At 1/72 scale, space will not be a limiting issue (nor will price, for that matter) and the size and weight is almost designed to be played with, since it can be securely held with one hand. Could it survive a 7 year old? I say yes. Maybe the antennas and weapons might detach but the model itself should remain in one piece. 

 

The Canadair Sabre was a jet fighter aircraft built by Canadair under licence from North American Aviation. A variant of the North American F-86 Sabre, it was produced until 1958 and used primarily by the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) until replaced with the Canadair CF-104 in 1962. Several other air forces also operated the aircraft.

In 1948, the Canadian government decided to re-equip the RCAF with the F-86 Sabre with Canadair contracted to produce them in MontrealQuebecCanada. An initial batch of 10 aircraft was ordered for tool verification. TheKorean War changed this to a production batch of 100 aircraft. Canadair slowly built up its production facility to make all components with related equipment obtained from other Canadian suppliers. Canadair gave the Sabre the project number CL-13.

Canadair produced six versions of the CL-13 Sabre. The sole Sabre Mk.1 was essentially the same as the North American Sabre F-86A. It had a General Electric J47-GE-13 turbojet of 5,200 lbf (23 kN) thrust. The Sabre Mk.2 had the same engine, although after the first 20 aircraft were produced, the remainder of the production run was distinguished in having power-assisted controls and an "all-flying" tailplane. The sole Sabre Mk 3 was the first of the Canadian Sabres to use the Avro Canada Orenda turbojet (Orenda 3 with 6,000 lbf (27 kN) thrust). The Sabre Mk.4 retained the General Electric engine and was destined for the RAF and was later passed on to other overseas air forces. The Sabre Mk.5 was the next production version, equipped with an Orenda 10 with 6,500 lbf (29 kN) thrust. A change to the Orenda 14 with 7,440 lbf (33 kN) powered the Sabre Mk.6. The designation Sabre Mk.7 was mainly experimental.