Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey 1/150 Scale Diecast Metal Model by Model Power

$ 24.99

1:150 Scale  Diecast Metal – Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey – Length: 4.75"  Wingspan: 6” (from rotor tip to rotor tip)

 This V-22 model is made to be displayed in the inflight configuration. It is mostly made of metal and very heavy/dense. It is certainly not a toy and will not survive been played with or a fall.

The box is labeled as Adult Collectible Model and Recommends 14 and older.

Although it is a small scale, the details are very impressive. From the photos one can see and appreciate the transparent cockpit windshield. The propellers are free to rotate and very smooth. If one blows onto the them they would start spinning. The engines are able to rotate into different positions. There are very few gaps and/or joints in this model.

Since there is no option for a landing gear, a stand where the model can be attached for display is included and the model's info (type of airplane and scale).

 The maker of the model, Model Power, really did a good job with the model, the panel lines and details are very clear and crisp.What really caught my attention, however, is the way the markings and coloring.

The Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey is an American multi-mission, tiltrotor military aircraft with both a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL), and short takeoff and landing (STOL) capability. It is designed to combine the functionality of a conventional helicopter with the long-range, high-speed cruise performance of a turboprop aircraft.

The V-22 originated from the United States Department of Defense Joint-service Vertical take-off/landing Experimental (JVX) aircraft program started in 1981. The team of Bell Helicopter and Boeing Helicopters was awarded a development contract in 1983 for the tiltrotor aircraft. The Bell Boeing team jointly produce the aircraft.[5] The V-22 first flew in 1989, and began flight testing and design alterations; the complexity and difficulties of being the first tiltrotor intended for military service in the world led to many years of development.

The United States Marine Corps began crew training for the Osprey in 2000, and fielded it in 2007; it supplemented and then replaced their Boeing Vertol CH-46 Sea Knights. The Osprey's other operator, the U.S. Air Force, fielded their version of the tiltrotor in 2009. Since entering service with the U.S. Marine Corps and Air Force, the Osprey has been deployed in transportation and medivac operations over Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya and Kuwait.