Vickers Valiant British Bomber 1/144 Scale Diecast Metal Model by Amercom

$ 29.99

1:144 Scale Diecast Metal - Vickers Valiant - Length: 9.25"  Wingspan: 9.5”

 

This Valiant model has its landing gear modeled in the extended position and is fixed. A display stand with information about the particular model is included.

 

At a 1/144 scale, this model is compatible with the airline models. What is interesting is that the cockpit windshield in this model is actually made of clear plastic with very detailed painting. I mention this because in the airline models it is usually just painted on.

 

This is really a "no-play" model or a "display-only" model. It is mostly metal and very heavy. It also has a number of antennas which look great but are very fragile. If you have small kids that like to play with your models, save yourself some frustration (and money) and wait till later to get a model like this one. The box is labeled as not suitable for children under 14.

 

The maker of this model, Amercom, did a good job with this model, specifically the color scheme and the markings are very crisp and clear. The panel lines and hatches are very nicely done (engraved). 

The packaging of these models is very minimal, nothing more than a simple blister pack with the model sandwiched between two transparent plastic shells. The packaging is really best described as "disposable"; although this is done in part to keep costs down, it nevertheless keeps the model safe and secure.The packaging might be low cost, but it is quite sturdy and serves its purpose well.

 

For this particular model, it turns out that it is "back heavy" so if you rest it on its landing gear, the tail will tip all the way to the floor. (That is why I did not take photos of it resting on the landing gear)

 

The pack measures 10 inches by 10 inches by 3.25 inches.

 

The Vickers-Armstrongs Valiant was a British four-jet bomber, once part of the Royal Air Force's V bomber nuclear force in the 1950s and 1960s. The Valiant was the first of the V bombers to become operational, and was followed by the Handley Page Victor and the Avro Vulcan; however it was noticeably less advanced than its counterparts. Several Valiants were soon converted to perform various support roles, such as aerial refuelling tankers and reconnaissance aircraft.

The Valiant was intended for operations as a high-level strategic bomber. By late 1964 it was found that all variants of the Valiant showed premature fatiguing and inter-crystalline corrosion in wing spar attachment castings traced to the use of a poorly understood[1] [N 1] aluminium alloy, DTD683. Rather than proceeding with an expensive rebuilding program, the Valiant was formally retired in 1965. Its duties were continued by the other V-bombers which remained in service until the 1980s.