Sukhoi Su-25 TM Frogfoot 1/100 Scale Die-cast Model by Italeri

$ 18.99

1:00 Scale  Metal Die-Cast – Sukhoi Su-25 TM Frogfoot  – Length: 6"  Wing Span: 6”

 

1:00 Scale Metal Die-Cast - Su-25TM Frogfoot - Length: 6." Wingspan: 6" This Su-25 model is a single seat model and does not include a pilot figure. The cockpit can not open. There is no option to display the landing gear. Attached to the wings are a pair of AA missiles, a pair of rocket launchers, a pair of air to ground missiles, a pair of bombs and a pair of external fuel tanks. A stand where the model can be attached for display is included and the model's info (type of airplane, squadron name, base and country).

 

 

The maker of the model, Italeri, really did a good job with the model, the panel lines and details are very clear and crisp.What really caught my attention, however, is the way the markings and coloring are done. At 1/100 scale, these models are in the range of 5.5 to 7 inches long, and although not as big as their 1/72 cousins, the details in the markings is very impressive. I looked at them under a magnifying glass (just out of curiosity) and one could actually read the text in the markings.

 

 

These models come in what could be described as a blister pack (sandwiched between two transparent plastic shells and then glued/attached to a piece of cardboard with the branding info. Some bigger models (say the A-10 or F-15) will have the same blister pack inside a simple box, but at the end, the packaging is supposed to be disposable and with the sole function protecting the model.

 

Unlike bigger models, there is nothing to assemble for these models. All weapons and fuel tanks are already attached to the model. One just needs to open the pack and display it (or play with it).

 

The packaging labels these model as "Collectible Product" and "Not suitable for children under 14 years". I say these are PERFECT to collect and play. At 1/100 scale, space will not be a limiting issue (nor will price, for that matter) and the size and weight is almost designed to be played with, since it can be securely held with one hand. Could it survive a 7 year old? I say yes. Maybe the antennas and weapons might detach but the model itself should remain in one piece. 

The Sukhoi Su-25 (NATO reporting name: "Frogfoot") is a single-seat, twin-engine jet aircraftdeveloped in the Soviet Union by the Sukhoi Design Bureau. It was designed to provide close air support for the Soviet Ground Forces. The first prototype made its maiden flight on 22 February 1975. After testing, the aircraft went into series production in 1978 at Tbilisi in theSoviet Republic of GeorgiaRussian air and ground forces nicknamed it "Gratch" ("Rook").

Early variants included the Su-25UB two-seat trainer, the Su-25BM for target-towing, and the Su-25K for export customers. Some aircraft were being upgraded to Su-25SM standard in 2012. The Su-25T and the Su-25TM (also known as the Su-39) were further developments, not produced in significant numbers. The Su-25, and the Su-34, were the only armoured, fixed-wing aircraft in production in 2007.[1] Su-25s are in service with Russia, other CIS states, and export customers.

The type has seen combat in several conflicts during its more than 30 years in service. It was heavily involved in the Soviet war in Afghanistan, flying counter-insurgency missions against the Mujahideen. The Iraqi Air Force employed Su-25s against Iran during the 1980–88 Iran–Iraq War. Most were later destroyed or flown to Iran in the 1991 Persian Gulf WarAbkhazianseparatists used Su-25s during the Abkhazian War from 1992 to 1993. The Macedonian Air Force used Su-25s against Albanian insurgents in the 2001 Macedonia conflict and, in 2008,Georgia and Russia both used Su-25s in the Russo-Georgian War. African states, including the Ivory CoastChad, and Sudan have used the Su-25 in local insurgencies and civil wars.

A second-generation Su-25T, the Su-25TM (also designated Su-39), has been developed with improved navigation and attack systems, and better survivability. While retaining the built-in Shkval of Su-25T, it may carry Kopyo (rus. "Spear") radar in the container under fuselage, which is used for engaging air targets (with RVV-AE/R-77 missiles) as well as ships (with Kh-31 and Kh-35 antiship missiles). The Russian Air Force has received 8 aircraft as of 2008.[72] Some of the improved avionics systems designed for T and TM variants have been included in the Su-25SM, an interim upgrade of the operational Russian Air Force Su-25, for improved survivability and combat capability.[15] The Su-25TM, as an all-inclusive upgrade programme has been replaced with the "affordable" Su-25SM programme.[74]

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