Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa Oscar Japanese Fighter - 1/72 Scale Diecast Metal Model by Atlas

$ 29.99

1:72 Scale  Metal Diecast - Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa - Oscar - Japanese Fighter – Length: 5"  Wingspan: 6”

 

This Ki-43 model is a single seat plane. The cockpit is glue shut. It has no pilot/crew figures included. The landing gear is optional, the pieces for the landing gear will need a little glue to be kept in place. The landing gear can be made to look in the retracted position (in flight) with the optional pieces. The fuel tanks in the wings are also optional. A display stand is included.

 

This is really a "no-play" model or a "display-only" model. It is mostly metal and very heavy. It also has a number of antennas which look great but are very fragile. If you have small kids that like to play with your models, save yourself some frustration (and money) and wait till later to get a model like this one. The box is labeled as not suitable for children under 14.

 

 

 

The maker of this model did a good job, specifically the color scheme and the markings are very crisp and clear. The panel lines and hatches are very nicely done (engraved).

 

This model comes in a plastic shell that measures 6 inches by 6 inches by 2 inches.

 

The Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa "Peregrine Falcon", "Army Type 1 Fighter" was a single-engine land-based tactical fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force in World War II.

The Allied reporting name was "Oscar", but it was often called the "Army Zero" by American pilots because it bore a certain resemblance to the Mitsubishi A6M Zero,[3] the Imperial Japanese Navy's counterpart to the Ki-43. Both aircraft had generally similar layout and lines, and also used essentially the same Nakajima Sakae radial engine, with similar round cowlings and bubble-type canopies (the Oscar's being distinctly smaller and having much less framing than the A6M). While relatively easy for a trained eye to tell apart with the "finer" lines of the Ki-43's fuselage — especially towards the tail — and more tapered wing planform; in the heat of battle, given the brief glimpses and distraction of combat, Allied aviators frequently made mistakes in enemy aircraft identification in the heat of a dogfight, reportedly having fought "Zeros" in areas where there were no Navy fighters.


 

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