KI-61 Toni Janapenese Fighter 1/72 Scale Diecast Metal Model by War Master

$ 24.99

War Master 1:72 Scale Diecast Metal  - Kawasaki Ki-61 Hien "Tony"  – Length: 5"  Wingspan: 6.5”

 

The Kawasaki Ki-61 Tony is a single seat airplane. The cockpit is glue shut. It has no pilot figure included. The landing gear is optional and can be attached or omitted to display the model in in-flight configuration. The covers for the wheel wells are included. A display stand is included.

 

A pair of external fuel tanks are included that can be attached to the wings.

 

This is really a "no-play" model or a "display-only" model. It is mostly metal and very heavy. It also has a number of antennas which look great but are very fragile. If you have small kids that like to play with your models, save yourself some frustration (and money) and wait till later to get a model like this one. The box is labeled as not suitable for children under 14.

 

The maker of this model, War Master, did a good job with this model, specifically the color scheme and the markings are very crisp and clear. The panel lines and hatches are very nicely done (engraved). If you look carefully at the photos you will notice that the paint job has some weathering details, there are darker lines simulating wear/oil leakage along some panel lines to some very nice effect.

 

The box measures at 7 inches by 7 inches by 3 inches.

 

The Kawasaki Ki-61 Hien (飛燕, "flying swallow") is a Japanese World War II fighter aircraft used by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force. The first encounter reports claimed Ki-61s were Messerschmitt Bf 109s: further reports claimed that the new aircraft was an Italian design, which led to the Allied reporting name of "Tony", assigned by the United States War Department.[1] The Japanese Army designation was "Army Type 3 Fighter" (三式戦闘機).[2] It was the only mass-produced Japanese fighter of the war to use a liquid-cooled inline V engine. Over 3,000 Ki-61s were produced. Initial prototypes saw action over Yokohama during the Halsey-Doolittle Raid on 18. April 1942, and continued to fly combat missions throughout the war.[3][4][5]