Grumman F6F Hellcat USN 1/72 Scale Diecast Metal Model by Amercom

$ 26.99

1:72 Scale  Diecast Metal  – Grumman F6F Hellcat – Length: 5.5"  Wingspan: 7”

 

This Hellcat model is a single seat model and does include a pilot figure. The cockpit can not open. The landing gear is nicely detailed and is fixed in the extended position. A stand where the model can be attached for display is included. The display stand has the model's info such as country, flag and scale.

 

The maker of the model, Amercom, really did a good job with the model, the diecast metal construction feels quite heavy. The metal seems too be more rigid and thicker than comparable 1/72 scale models. The panel lines and details are very clear and crisp.What really caught my attention, however, is the way the markings and coloring are done. 

 

 

These models come in what could be described as a disposable blister pack (sandwiched between two transparent plastic shells and then glued/attached to a piece of cardboard with the branding info. There is really nothing spectacular about the packaging, but at the end, the packaging is supposed to be disposable and with the sole function protecting the model, which it does very well.

 

Unlike bigger models, there is nothing to assemble for these models. All weapons and fuel tanks are already attached to the model. One just needs to open the pack and display it (or play with it).

 

The packaging labels these model as "Collectible Product" and "Not suitable for children under 14 years". I say these are PERFECT to collect and play. At 1/72 scale, space will not be a limiting issue (nor will price, for that matter) and the size and weight is almost designed to be played with, since it can be securely held with one hand. Could it survive a 7 year old? I say yes. Maybe the antennas and weapons might detach but the model itself should remain in one piece. 

 

The Grumman F6F Hellcat was a carrier-based fighter aircraft designed to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat in United States Navy (USN) service. The Hellcat competed with the faster Vought F4U Corsairfor use as a carrier based fighter. However, the Corsair had significant issues with carrier landings which the Hellcat did not, allowing the Hellcat to become the Navy's dominant fighter in the second part of World War II, a position the Hellcat did not relinquish. The Corsair instead was primarily deployed to great effect in land-based use by the U.S. Marine Corps.

Although the F6F resembled the Wildcat in some ways, it was a completely new design,[4] powered by a 2,000 hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800, the same powerplant used for both the Corsair and the United States Army Air Force's (USAAF) Republic P-47 Thunderbolt fighters. Some military observers tagged the Hellcat as the "Wildcat's big brother".[5]

The F6F was best known for its role as a rugged, well-designed carrier fighter which was able, after its combat debut in early 1943, to counter the Mitsubishi A6M Zero and help secure air superiority over the Pacific Theater. Such was the quality of the basic simple, straightforward design, that the Hellcat was the least modified fighter of the war, with a total of 12,200 being built in just over two years.[6]

Hellcats were credited with destroying 5,223 aircraft while in service with the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm[7][Note 2] This was more than any other Allied naval aircraft.[9] Postwar, the Hellcat was phased out of frontline service, but remained in service as late as 1954 as a night fighter.