Battleship IJN Musashi 1/1100 Scale Diecast Metal Model Ship by Eaglemoss

$ 32.99

1/1100 Scale Battleship Musashi: Length: 9", Width: 1.5"

 

Warships of the World collection from Eaglemoss is a breakthrough for both military and maritime enthusiasts. Each has details and features that even the most discriminating collectors will appreciate:

 

  • A consistent 1:1100 scale that makes for a stunning display, with each ship visually comparable to all the others in the collection.

 

  • Heavy-duty metal construction with finely molded plastic detail parts. Miniature aircraft with cranes, detailed guns with blast bags, and a complete superstructure.

 

  • Textured surfaces that simulate wooden decks, intricate ironwork, chains and cleats.

 

  • Accurate colors and markings, from anti-fouling paint on the hulls to camouflage patterns, national insignia (including roundels on aircraft), and even runway markings.

 

  • A removable, customized display stand with the ship's name (in Japanese) and year.

 

Musashi (武蔵?) was the second ship of the Yamato class of Imperial Japanese Navy World War IIbattleships.

She and her sister ship, Yamato, were the heaviest and most powerfully armed battleships ever constructed, displacing 72,800 tonnes at full load and armed with nine 46 cm (18.1 inch) Type 94main guns. Neither ship survived the war.

Named after Japan's ancient Musashi Province,[1] the Musashi was commissioned in mid-1942, modified to serve as the flagship of the Combined Fleet, and spent the rest of the year working up. The ship was transferred to Truk in early 1943 and sortied several times that year with the fleet in unsuccessful searches for American forces. She was used to transfer forces and equipment between Japan and various occupied islands several times in 1944. Torpedoed in early 1944 by an AmericansubmarineMusashi was forced to return to Japan for repairs, where the navy greatly augmented heranti-aircraft armament. She was present during the Battle of the Philippine Sea in June, but did not come in contact with American surface forces. Musashi was sunk by an estimated 19 torpedo and 17 bomb hits from American carrier-based aircraft on 24 October 1944 during the Battle of Leyte Gulf. Over half of her crew was rescued.

 

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