Churchill Mk III Heavy Infantry Tank 1/72 Scale Die-cast Model by Eaglemoss

$ 14.99

1:72 Scale Metal Die-Cast – Churchill Mk III Heavy Infantry Tank -  Length: 4.25" Width: 1.75”

 

This Churchill Mk III tank's main body is made of metal while the turret is made of plastic. The turret can rotate all 360 degrees and it has a pair of machine guns attached. The tracks are made of rubber and are fitted, however they do not move. The coloring and markings are accurate and realistic.

 

The maker of the model, Eaglemoss, really did a good job with the model, the panel lines and details are very clear and crisp. These models have different details engraved such as doors, hatches, panels, lights, ports, antennas, machine guns, ropes, shovels, etc; all of these done with high accuracy and proportion. When they are painted in different color, say for example, shovels and ropes, they are indeed painted accurately.

 

These models come in what could be described as a disposable blister pack. The packaging is very minimum, the blister back is just big enough to enclose the vehicle and the cardboard backing to which the blister is attached is barely bigger than the lengths and width dimension of the vehicle.

 

Although these models are inexpensive and just about the size of a (regular) computer mouse, they are certainly not toys. The tracks don't move and the turrets and their main guns and machine guns can be quite fragile because of their size. However, unlike airplanes and helicopters, tank models don't have all those think and long parts, so in practice,  a tank model would be able to withstand more than an airplane or helicopter model.

The Churchill tank was a British heavy infantry tank used in the Second World War, best known for its heavy armour, large longitudinal chassis with all-around tracks with multiple bogies, and its use as the basis of many specialist vehicles. It was one of the heaviestAllied tanks of the war.

The origins of the design lay in the expectation that war in Europe might be fought under similar conditions to those of the First World War, and emphasized the ability to cross difficult ground. The Churchill was rushed into production to build up British defences against a possible German invasion. The first vehicles had flaws that had to be overcome before the Churchill was accepted for wide use. After several Marks had been built a better armoured version, the Mark VII, entered service.

The Churchill was used by British and Commonwealth forces in North Africa, Italy and North-West Europe. In addition, a few hundred were supplied to the USSR and used on the Eastern Front.