Carrier IJN Taiho 1/1100 Scale Diecast Metal Model Ship by Eaglemoss

$ 32.99

1/1100 Scale Aircraft Carrier Taiho: Length: 9.5", Width: 1.25"

The packaging for this particular model is very minimal, it comes in a clam shells (sandwiched between two transparent protective pieces of plastic).

Warships of the World collection from Eaglemoss is a breakthrough for both military and maritime enthusiasts. Each has details and features that even the most discriminating collectors will appreciate:

 

  • A consistent 1:1100 scale that makes for a stunning display, with each ship visually comparable to all the others in the collection.

 

  • Heavy-duty metal construction with finely molded plastic detail parts. Miniature aircraft with cranes, detailed guns with blast bags, and a complete superstructure.

 

  • Textured surfaces that simulate wooden decks, intricate ironwork, chains and cleats.

 

  • Accurate colors and markings, from anti-fouling paint on the hulls to camouflage patterns, national insignia (including roundels on aircraft), and even runway markings.

 

  • A removable, customized display stand with the ship's name (in Japanese) and year.

 

For this model what is unusual (compared to other carrier models of the same line) is that the planes are lose, they are not glued to the deck. The six planes displayed in the photos come in little plastic bags (two of them for two different types of planes) and each plane is not much bigger than a grain of rice. One will have to decide whether or not to glue the planes onto the deck or risk losing them.

 

Taihō (大鳳?) (meaning Great Phoenix), was an aircraft carrier of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. Possessing heavy belt armor and featuring an armored flight deck (a first for any Japanese carrier), she represented a major departure in Japanese carrier design and was expected to not only survive multiple bomb, torpedo or shell hits but also continue fighting effectively.

Built by Kawasaki at Kobe, she was laid down on 10 July 1941, launched almost two years later on 7 April 1943 and finally commissioned on 7 March 1944. She sank on 19 June 1944 during the Battle of the Philippine Sea after suffering a single torpedo hit from the American submarine USS Albacore, due to explosions resulting from design flaws and poor damage control.