Carrier IJN Akagi 1/1100 Scale Diecast Metal Model Ship by Eaglemoss

$ 32.99

1/1100 Scale Aircraft Carrier Akagi: Length: 9.5", Width: 1.25"

The packaging for this particular model is very minimal, it comes in a clam shell. (sandwiched between two transparent protective pieces of plastic).

Warships of the World collection from Eaglemoss is a breakthrough for both military and maritime enthusiasts. Each has details and features that even the most discriminating collectors will appreciate:

 

  • A consistent 1:1100 scale that makes for a stunning display, with each ship visually comparable to all the others in the collection.

 

  • Heavy-duty metal construction with finely molded plastic detail parts. Miniature aircraft with cranes, detailed guns with blast bags, and a complete superstructure.

 

  • Textured surfaces that simulate wooden decks, intricate ironwork, chains and cleats.

 

  • Accurate colors and markings, from anti-fouling paint on the hulls to camouflage patterns, national insignia (including roundels on aircraft), and even runway markings.

 

  • A removable, customized display stand with the ship's name (in Japanese) and year.

 

Akagi (Japanese赤城?, "Red Castle") was an aircraft carrier of the Imperial Japanese Navy(IJN), named after Mount Akagi in present-day Gunma Prefecture. Though she was laid downas an Amagi-class battlecruiserAkagi was converted to an aircraft carrier while still under construction to comply with the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty. The ship was rebuilt from 1935 to 1938 with her original three flight decks consolidated into a single enlarged flight deck and an island superstructure. The second Japanese aircraft carrier to enter service, and the first large or "fleet" carrierAkagi figured prominently in the development of the IJN's revolutionary carrier striking force doctrine that grouped carriers together, concentrating their air power. This doctrine enabled Japan to attain its strategic goals during the early stages of the Pacific War from December 1941 until mid-1942.

Akagi‍ '​s aircraft served in the Second Sino-Japanese War in the late 1930s. Upon the formation of the First Air Fleet or Kido Butai (Striking Force) in early 1941, she became itsflagship, and remained so for the duration of her service. With other fleet carriers, she took part in the Attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941 and the invasion of Rabaul in the Southwest Pacific in January 1942. The following month, her aircraft bombed Darwin, Australia, and assisted in the conquest of the Dutch East Indies. In March and April 1942,Akagi‍‍ '​‍s aircraft helped sink a British heavy cruiser and an Australian destroyer in the Indian Ocean Raid.

After a brief refit, Akagi and three other fleet carriers of the Kido Butai participated in theBattle of Midway in June 1942. After bombarding American forces on the atollAkagi and the other carriers were attacked by aircraft from Midway and the carriers EnterpriseHornet, andYorktownDive bombers from Enterprise severely damaged Akagi. When it became obvious she could not be saved, she was scuttled by Japanese destroyers to prevent her from falling into enemy hands. The loss of Akagi and three other IJN carriers at Midway was a crucial strategic defeat for Japan and contributed significantly to the Allies' ultimate victory in the Pacific.

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