Boeing F/A-18F (F-18) Super Hornet - Royal Australian Air Force - 1/72 Scale Diecast Model by Hobby Master

$ 139.99

1:72 Scale Metal Diecast – Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet - Royal Australian Air Force Operation Okra - A44-212, 1st Sqn - Length: 10.25"  Wingspan: 7.5”

This F/A-18F model is twin seat and includes two pilot/crew figures. The canopy cannot open or close, instead two canopy pieces are included, one for each opositon. One has to be very careful as to not damage/break the canopy. The landing gear is optional, one can attach the landing gear or cover the wheel wells. A stand included. 

This model comes with a variety possible attachments. Some missiles are already attached to the model, but some fuel tanks, missiles and fuel tanks are optional.

The maker of the model, Hobby Master, really did a good job with the model, the panel lines and details are very crisp and one can see the little dots that represent the rivets holding down the panels.

This is really a "no-play" model or a "display-only" model. It is mostly metal and very heavy. It also has a number of antennas which look great but are very fragile. If you have small kids that like to play with your models, save yourself some frustration (and money) and wait till later to get a model like this one. The box is labeled as not suitable for children under 14.

The package measures 11" x 11" x 4"

The Boeing F/A-18E and F/A-18F Super Hornet are twin-engine carrier-capable multirole fighter aircraft variants based on the McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet. The F/A-18E single-seat and F/A-18F tandem-seat variants are larger and more advanced derivatives of the F/A-18C and D Hornet. The Super Hornet has an internal 20 mm M61 rotary cannon and can carry air-to-air missiles and air-to-surface weapons. Additional fuel can be carried in up to five external fuel tanks and the aircraft can be configured as an airborne tanker by adding an external air refueling system.

Designed and initially produced by McDonnell Douglas, the Super Hornet first flew in 1995. Low-rate production began in early 1997 with full-rate production starting in September 1997, after the merger of McDonnell Douglas and Boeing the previous month. The Super Hornet entered service with the United States Navy in 1999, replacing the Grumman F-14 Tomcat, which was retired in 2006; the Super Hornet serves alongside the original Hornet. The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), which has operated the F/A-18A as its main fighter since 1984, ordered the F/A-18F in 2007 to replace its aging F-111C fleet. RAAF Super Hornets entered service in December 2010.